Fetishes

Objectophilia: The Object of My Affection

Tower Bridge in London

There’s a reason you don’t hear too much about bridge or table fetishism on dating sites. People who experience objectophilia, or sexual attraction to architectural structures, vehicles, walls, and other inanimate objects, aren’t looking to date anyone—they date roller coasters, vacuum cleaners, and museum doors.

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Most objectophiles also reject the idea that they are kinky—they aren’t just sexually turned on by forklifts or roads, but also feel an emotional connection to them. Many are in long-term relationships or even marriages with their object of choice.

Some psychologists and doctors, along with objectophiles, view object attraction as an orientation rather than a fetish or kink. Many folks who are married to transport trucks or lamps say they understood even as children that their orientation was towards objects.

One man’s experience began in adolescence. He describes falling head over heels in love with a Hammond organ, and described the relationship as emotionally complex. He is turned on by the mechanical workings of objects such as radiators and musical instruments.

Certainly such stories make for attention grabbing tabloid headlines: “I Married a Pizza!” The details titillate, or make us titter, depending. But contemplating these love stories explores the mysteries of human sexuality and the mind.

On the one hand, objectophilia is a fetish taken to the extreme. Technically a fetish means a person can’t function sexually without involving that fetish with a partner, whether it’s a foot fetish or the need to be bound and gagged.

An objectophile no longer has the person with which kinky people explore their fetish or kink. The fetish becomes the object, replacing the human connection completely.

This has led to lots of speculation that objectophiles have a pathology, a deep emotional disturbance, a hatred for being human, or even that they are sociopaths.

The fact that the partner or sex object is not making any emotional demands, doesn’t have any sexual needs or other needs, can be seen as a kind of pathological narcissism or selfishness.

However, advocates and allies for neurodiverse individuals—people with autism—have put their two cents into the discussion. Many objectophiles are on the autism spectrum. In the same way that folks on the spectrum may be more at ease with numbers, objects, mechanics, and have difficulty reading emotional and human communication, their experience of sexual desire and romantic attraction is also different from people who aren’t on the spectrum.

While other kinky folks and fetishists may derive great emotional pleasure and satisfaction from their sexual turn ons, it tends to be from the pleasure or the journey of exploration or sharing a kink with a partner. Observing stories from objectophiles, it’s easy to see that the parallels are more towards the human relationship than the object one. They speak of being faithful or having feelings towards multiple objects at the same time, of serial monogamy, of breaking up, or of falling in love at first sight.

For example, a woman who was going out with a calculator admits she is tempted by iPods and treadmills. Ultimately, though, she was most attracted to Tetris, the game, and plans to marry it.

Another woman has been in love with a train station for three decades, and other objects that attract her are just fleeting.

Objectophiles report great sexual and relationship satisfaction and happiness, with few frustrations, which also differs from most people who date men and women!

Tell us what you think!

Tell us what you think!

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